John PAGE (1887-1918)

9th Infantry Brigade AIF

MAIN MENU. 34th BATTALION PAGE.


Memorial Plaque to John Page

34th BATTALION A.I.F.

Sergeant: 2135 John "Jack" PAGE. M.M.


Born: 22nd January 1887. Blackbilles via Quirindi, New South Wales, Australia. Birth Cert: 22788/1887.

Married: 22nd October 1918. Parish Church, Harefield, Hallifax, England. Marriage Cert:ME1489.

Wife: Elsie Beatrice Page. nee: Hawkins.

Died: 11th November 1918. (Armistice Day) Died of Disease


Father: Peter John Page. (18..-1922) Died at Walgett, N.S.W. Death Cert:1370/1922.

Mother: Esther Page. nee: Stockdale. (1863-1894) Born at Gosford, N.S.W. Birth Cert:6301/1863 and died at Quirindi, N.S.W. Death Cert:11452/1894.


INFORMATION

John Page enlisted with the 3rd Reinforcements 34th Battalion AIF on the 13th of April 1916 and left Sydney on board HMAT A68 "Anchises"on the 24th of August 1916 and was marched into training camp. John proceeded overseas from Southampton for France on the 21st of November 1916 and was Taken on Strength with the 34th in France.

The 34th Battalion left Larkhill on the 21st November and entrained at Amesbury for Southampton, embarking on the S.S "Arundel". The transport section left by S.S. "Princess Victoria". The Battalion arrived at Le Harve, France on the 22nd November 1916. Disembarkation commenced at 8:00am and the Battalion marched to No;1 camp on the Hill, arriving at 2:00pm. The men carried heavy loads, in some cases amounting to miniature Q.M.' Stores. The march over cobblestones was very tiring, notwithstanding the many route marches which had been carried out at Larkhill. However, after bathing their feet and receiving treatment, as well partaking of a good meal, some spent a comfortable night.

The following morning the Battalion moved to Le Harve Railway Station, leaving D Company behind. On arrival at the Station entraining commenced at 8:00am and the train left at 11:15am. The journey was slow and occupied until 4:30pm on the 24th. On arrival at Bailleul the men detrained and marched to Outtersteene. D Company arrived at 4:00pm the following day. The Battalion rested here in billets for two days previous to taking over garrison duties in the Line at Armenties. The Commanding Officer Lieutenant Colonel. Malcolm St John LAMB. with the Adjutant, Company Commanders, N.C.O's and Specialists went into the Line to inspect Trenches, Stores, Plans and to arrange for the taking over this Section of the line on the following day.

The specialists and N.C.O's remained in the Line. On 27th November the Battalion went into the Line in the L'Epinette Sector. The men were taken up by motor lorries as far as the Square near Houplines Station, and marched via Butterne Avenue and Willow Walk to the Line, carrying their packs and blankets into the trenches. Lewis Gun ammunition was taken into the Line with the tin cases. The going was difficult owing to the conditions of the Trenches and the heavy and bulky loads. Later the blankets were dumped near Tussage Dump, from which most of them disappeared. This was the main incident of our relief in the Line.

The Sector taken over had been held by the NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILLIERS whom the 34th Battalion relieved. Specialists of this Regiment remained for a couple of days to arrange and assist in the routine. We were greeted with a display of Verey Lights and, apparently anxious to see the newcomers, the enemy searched our Sector with his searchlights throughout the night, which was misty and dark. Our Artillery and Trench Mortars put over a heavy barrage, either to let Fritz know we had arrived or to cover the change over; this was the signal for increased activity of enemy Machine Gun and Rifle fire to which the Battalion energetically replied.

During the night Patrols were sent out, Listening Posts established and wiring was commenced. Dawn broke with a thick mist hanging over the Sector and our men could get very little idea of the new frontage. Our Artillery and Trench Mortars were busy registering on the enemy positions throughout the day and Fritz retaliated with Machine Gun and Rifle fire. The first day passed with no special incidents. Our first Casualty occured on the following morning at sunrise when Private: 148 William PECK was sniped with an explosive bullet through the forehead. Counter battery work, Machine Gun firing and sniping were fairly active during our first term in the Line. The first Casualty occured on the morning of the 3rd of December at sunrise when Private: 148 William PECK was sniped with an explosive bullet through the forehead. Counter battery work, Machine Gun firing and sniping were fairly active during our first term in the Line.

Considerable damage was done to our Trenches and parapets and one of our Listening Posts was destroyed. Some enemy Patrols were dispered by our snipers. Enemy working parties were fairly active on our front and his patrols were strong. Considerable road and rail transport was noticeable behind the enemy lines. The Battalion livened things up generally in the Sector which of late had been fairly quiet and Fritz did not appreciate the change. Just before being relieved we presented them with an issue of Gas. The Trenches were in a very wet and muddy condition. The water in the bottom of them being frequently frozen, the ice had to be broken to provide sufficient cover for the men, as the parapets were not high enough to allow walking on the ice. Thus the men had to stand in the freezing water and mud, with the result that the constant wet and cold caused many evacuations with trench feet.

The 33rd Battalion was on our left and the New Zealanders were on our flank during this period. After six days in the Line we were relieved and marched to Billets in Armentieres. The Battalion Headquarters were at No: 6 Rue de Strasburg, the Quarter Master's Store at No: 28. Billet routine from the 4th to 10th December 1916 consisted of a general clean up and Bath Parades to Erquinghem.

On the 11th December 1916 the 34th Battalion went into the Line again. "B" Company occupying the Subsidiary line instead of "D" Company, as in the first period. The weather was still cold and misty. The usual counter battery work was carried out by the Artillery and Trench Mortars. Some shells from our own "Heavies" dropped short and fell into our front Line. Sniping on both sides was again active. Extra Patrols were sent out to engage the strong fighting enemy Patrols in No Man's Land. The enemy was busy with his Working Parties and good work was also done by the wiring parties. Two extra Lewis Guns were added to the Front Line for the purpose of sweeping the enemy parapets and wire, in retaliation for enemy sniping which had become most active and causing trouble.

This was the beginning of continuous sweeping of parapets on both sides during the whole period of holding this Sector of the Line. The 34th Battalion Patrols were contesting No Man's Land, which up to this time Fritz considered belonged to him. Heavy bombardments were carried out which caused considerable damage to the Trenches and Supports on both sides. quite a number of Men were being evacuated with trench feet through standing in the cold and wet, notwithstanding that dry socks were issued every day to the troops. during this period there were a number of casualties, including 6 K.I.A.and Lieutenant: Stephen Matthew HARRIS was the first the Officer wounded. Captain: Walter Hedland Valentine BAKER. and Lieutenant: Frederick Llewllyn EAST. and a number of men were also evacuated sick.

Casualties; Private: 742 Clifford Reginal DAVIES.

The 34th Battalion was relieved on the 18th of December 1916 and marched to billets in Armentieres. Captain: Edmund BEAVER injured by shell fire, and several other ranks sick, were evacuated from here. On the 23rd December 1916 the 34th Battalion moved to Reserve Billets at La Blanc Masion, where the buildings of hutments and stables for muleswas carried out. The roads were flooded two or three feet deep and Carrying Parties of men erecting the hutments had to wade through this, in many cases waist deep. While here the Commanding Officer Lieutenant Colonel. Malcolm St John LAMB. left for Army School. Christmas Day, the first and what proved to be the worst in France, was spent in Billets, only in the course of erection. The rations for Christmas Dinner were plentiful, but the cooking facilities were poor and the troops were somewhat "fed up" with the environment and bad weather.

Each man had 1lb of Pudding and a quart of Beer if he wished. The Pudding was supplied by the Comforts Fund and the Beer from the Regimental Funds. Working Parties had to be provided both on Christmas and New Year's Day. On the 31st of December 1916 Lieutenant Colonel. Malcolm St John LAMB. returned to the 34th Battalion and on the 4th January 1917 Headquarters and "A" Company moved to Jesus Farm and joined the remainded of the 34th Battalion in hutments, which were now finished. The following day Major: Walter Arnold LeRoy FRY. left for the Training Battalion at Larkhill. A few men were evacuated sick and one, Private: A LEACH of the Australian Medical Corps Staff, died.

John was promoted to Lance Corporal on the 7th January 1917

On the 6th May 1917, John was Wounded in Action; 1st Occassion when he received a Gun Shot Wound to his Groin and was treated by the 9th Australian field Ambulance in the field before he was evacuated to the 2nd Australian Casualty Clearing Station for further treatment and spent several weeks in Hospital recovering but rejoined his unit on the 15th June and a few days later he was again promoted to Temorary Corporal. On the 24th July John was Wounded in Action; 2nd Occassion when he received a Gun Shot Wound to the Neck whilst in Belgium and was treated by the 11th Australian Field Ambulance and was again evacuated to the 2nd Australian Casualty Clearing Station where re revereted to the rank of Lance Corporal upon his evacuation.

John embarked for England onboard the "Carisbrook Castle" on the 5th of August 1917 where he was admitted to the Richmond Military Hospital for further treatment. Upon his discharge he was marched in the the No:2 Command Depot at Dartford on the 17th of August where he remained until the 14th September where he was marched out to the No:4 Command Depot and proceeded overseas for France via Southampton on the 20th October 1917 and was marched out to his unit on the 24th and rejoined them on the 27th October 1917. John was promoted to Corporal on the 16th November 1917 vice; Corporal: 1221 Michael John QUINN who was evacuated when he was Wounded in Action and then the Temporary Sergeant when Sergeant: 917 Thomas WILLIAMS was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant.

Promoted to Sergeant on the 2nd December 1917 when Sergeant: 1070 Donald Frederick BERMAN was evacuated when he was Wounded in Action before he attended Brigade School on the 13th January 1918 until the 23rd February.

3rd March 1918.

WARNETON

9:00am. Weather dull and very cold. Our Artillery fairly active throughout the day, Enemy Artillery quiet. 11:45am. 9th Infantry Brigade Raiding Party of 300 strong racked enemy trenches opposite 33rd Battalion Sector on our right. Raid very successful 1 Officer 11 other ranks being brought back prisoners. 34th Battalion casualties in the raid were 1 other ranks Killed 3 other ranks Wounded. There was no Artillery retaliation on our Sector.

Lance Corporal: 2597 John Henry JOHNSTON.

At 11.45pm on the 3rd March a combined 9th Brigade Raid took place, which proved most successful. One Officer and 11 Other Ranks were brought back as prisoners. Our casualties were 3 wounded. The following night the brigade Raiders again entered the enemy Trenches ans succeesed in killing 40 of the enemy.

Private: 7533 Walter Godfrey SMITH. 34th BN AIF. Killed in Action 05/03/1918 France.

This Raid however was not so successful as the previous night. The Battalion losing one of its efficient Officers Captain: 717 Benjamin Greenup BRODIE. These Raids were well organised and the men, who had been especially trained, were well equipped. On the second night 100 men of the Battalion took part. The object of the Raid was to blow up Dug Outs and Tunnels. The Assembly Point was in the front of the 33rd Battalion Outpost near No: 7 Post in the front of the Sugar Refinery. Our men were in "C"Company of the Raiders, with Captain: 717 Benjamin Greenup BRODIE in charge. Lieutenant Colonel John Alexander MILNE, 36th Battalion was in charge of the Brigade Raid. Each man carried three of four Bombs. Some were Rifle Grenadies, others Lewis Gunners, some Bombers and also Bayonet Men. Most were dressed in Tommy Uniforms. The Demolition Party carried special charges and detonators. It rained heavily during march to the Assembly Point and the men enjoyed the hot Cocoa and Coffee supplied by the Y.M.C.A on the way up.

Warenton Trench

The Barrage opened at 12:50am 1 Officer and 4 Other Ranks went forward to lay the tape for direction. Seven minutes later the Covering Party went out and laid in the enemy wire, 45 yards from his Trenches. This Party was armed with Lewis Guns, Bombs and grenades and was in charge of Sergeant: 841 William Samuel MUDFORD. The Main Raiding Party followed the tape and passing through the gaps cut the wire, entering the Trenches. Some strong opposition was encountered from the enemy, with Grenades and Machine Gun fire. Captain: 717 Benjamin Greenup BRODIE while standing on the parapet, directing operations, was hit in the chest and side by Machine Gun Bullets. Lieutenant: 64 Alfred James FELL. and his Party proceeded up the Communication Trench, while Sergeant: 145 Charles Henry NUNN worked along the Front Line to the left. Much opposition was met, as the enemy was apparently waiting in strong force. After six minutes they withdrew, bringing Captain: 717 Benjamin Greenup BRODIE out, who died on the way back. Lieutenant: 12944 Mervyn REES who was in charge of another Party, also returned after doing good work. Shortly afterwards the Covering Party under Sergeant: 841 William Samuel MUDFORD. returned and the 33rd BATTALION again took over the Post. Later the enemy retailated with heavy Shell Fire.

On the 4th March 1918, 34th Battalion Company Commander summoned Captain: 717 Benjamin Greenup BRODIE to his dugout. ‘Warning order, Ben. We’ve got a manoeuvre on tonight and our company’s drawn the short straw. Make all preparations, will you? And by the way, you’ll be leading the push.’ BRODIE passed on the information to his platoon commanders and then settled into his dugout to get some rest. Too stimulated to sleep, he reached into his pack and extracted his writing pad to start a letter to his wife. Later, the Commanding Officer conducted the briefing on the plan of attack for the night’s raid, which was to be the same strength as the night before. Sergeant: 841 William Samuel MUDFORD. you’ll take the covering party on the left flank. You’ll have the Lewis guns, the bombers and plenty of bombs. The right flank will be handled by the 33rd. Lieutenant: 64 Alfred James FELL. you’ll have the taping party and support Sergeant Nunn with the demolition charges. Captain: 717 Benjamin Greenup BRODIE you’ll be leading our blokes—about a hundred in all. Your mission is to blow up the tunnels and the dugouts, capture whoever you can and get the hell out. And don’t worry, we’ll have artillery support. The barrage starts at 0050 hours. Any questions?’

The men checked their weapons again. Most carried pistols, some carried clubs studded with nails and each of the raiders carried three or four bombs stuffed into the pockets of their tunics. As they waited till it was time to make their way to the assembly point, the heavens opened up, soaking the Diggers to the skin and creating a sea of viscous mud that clogged the soles of their boots. Volunteers of the YMCA and Salvation Army mingled with the troops, handing out cups of hot cocoa and coffee until it was time to go. As the 18-pounders commenced firing, signalling the start of the raid, Captain: 717 Benjamin Greenup BRODIE dispatched the officer and four Diggers to lay the forming-up tape. Seven minutes later, he sent out Sergeant: 841 William Samuel MUDFORD'S. covering party.3 Using the tape as a guide in the dark, they took up positions in the German wire emplacements—a mere 45 metres from the enemy.

The main raiding party moved out, passing through the gaps that had been cut in the wire. Suddenly, a flare burst above them, creating pandemonium as the pale light illuminated the battlefield. ‘Go! Go! Go!’Captain: 717 Benjamin Greenup BRODIE yelled, waving his troops forward. The enemy attacked relentlessly with grenades and machine-guns. Captain: 717 Benjamin Greenup BRODIE stormed up to the parapet, urging the Diggers into the trench. As he directed his men towards shelter, a burst from a machine-gun hit him in the side and chest. He dropped to his knees, but continued to yell commands. The stretcher-bearers grabbed their fallen captain and frantically pushed shell dressings into his gaping wounds.

BRODIE'S second in command, Lieutenant: 64 Alfred James FELL., went about setting the explosives, while Sergeant: 145 Charles Henry NUNN led a party along the trench to the left. Reconnoitering around a bend in the trench, NUNN saw a large enemy force moving toward them. The Germans had anticipated the incursion and planned on trapping the raiders before they could withdraw. NUNN sent a runner to Fell with a message, 'Germans coming, lots of them!’ Lieutenant: 64 Alfred James FELL. immediately gave the order to withdraw. He then hurriedly made his way back to BRODIE and knelt down beside the badly wounded officer, who by now had been placed on a stretcher with a knapsack supporting his head. BRODIE grabbed FELL by the uniform, pulling him closer. ‘Make sure you account for everyone before we leave, FELL’, he muttered. As they made their way back to their lines, Brodie repeatedly questioned his stretcher-bearer, Private: 2861 Arthur FREW. (Australian Field Ambulance), on the state of his men.5 FREW reassured his patient that all was well, realising that although BRODIE was gravely wounded, the officer’s concern was not for himself but for the safety of his men. As they reached the protection of the parapet, a relieved FREW leaned nearer the officer’s head. ‘We’ve made it, Sir, we’ve…’ But it was too late, BRODIE was dead.

During the afternoon enemy Planes were very active and a squadron flew over. One of the Planes released a paper balloon carrying pamphlets. These were collected and sent to Divisional Headquarters. At 2.40pm on 6th March Warneton Tower was brought down by the 5th shot of a 15 inch Gun, much to the delight of the Troops who heartily cheered its downfall. On 7th March the Battalion, on being relieved by the 24th Battalion marched to Hyde Park Corner and were conveyed by light railway to Romarin Camp. The following day the men marched to Steenwereck and entrained for Desures. Having detrained, the Battalion marched to Billets at Le Wast, arriving at 11.00pm on 9th March. The Billets were comfortable but somewhat scattered. The weather was fine and mild.

The Transport travelled by road from Romarin Camp, arriving in grand condition and were complimented on their smartness. Training was carried out in the mornings, while the afternoons were devoted to sports. The men were given leave to boulogne and St Omer. A Brigade School was formed under Major: Walter Arnold LeRoy FRY. and Major: Harry Lambert Edward Dixon WHEELER. became Commanding Officer of the Battalion. On 22nd March the Battalion left Le Mast and after marching to Lottinghem, entrained for Abeele, where it arrived the next day and marched to Waton. That evening Orders were received to be prepared to move and that all surplus baggage, including Officers' valises, was to be dumped. Leaving Waton on 24th March the Battalion marched to near Abeele and embussed for Wallon-Cappel in the Sercus area. On arriving at Hazebrouck the men debussed and marched to Le Belle Hotesse, and were under Orders to be ready to move at any moment.

7th March 1918

MILITARY MEDAL

No:2135, Sergeant John PAGE 34th Battalion AIF. For devoted service on night of 4/5th March 1918 during raid on enemy trenches in vicinity of WARNETON. With his party was temporarily held up by superior numbers of the enemy in the trench leading to his final objective, but by his personal courage and determined fighting he eventually cleared the way for the advance. His gallant efforts were an inspiration to all ranks.

London Gazette 25th April 1918. Page 5037 Position 34.

Commonwealth of Australia Gazette 7th of August 1918. Page 1657 Position 70.

8th August 1918.

Report of the Operation Conducted by the Battalion This Day. Headquarters 34th Battalion AIF. 8-8-18

ASSEMBLY. The Assembly March passed without incident and there were no casualties. The Battalion was in position for the assault at 3:25 am.

BARRARGE. The barrarge opened at 4:20am and was accurately placed. The enemy immediately fired single and double Red and Golden Rain Light Signals. The enemy's reply to our barrarge was very ineffective but his Machine Gun fire was considerable during the early stages of the advance, but caused very few casualties.

LOCATIONS. Battalion Headquarters was located at P.16.c.1.7 before Zero, after Zero a temporary Headquarters was established at the Quarry at P.16.b.2.8 pending the report and the capture of ACCROCHE WOOD, from the two flank Companies.

THE ADVANCE. Owing to the dense fog observation was impossible and the tanks appeared to have great difficulty in keeping in touch with the direction. Runners were sent forward at 4:45 am to get in touch with the assault parties and at 5:15 am they brought back word from Captain: Albert Edward YATES 35th Battalion that his Company was through the Wood. Battalion Headquarters then moved forward through the wood towards CERISY VALLEY.About 150 stragglers of all Battalions including 3 Lewis Gun Teams were collected during the advance and formed into a Company.

Owing to the density of the fog and the obscurity of the forward position forward I depolyed the Company and took them forward as far as GAILLY Line arriving there at 5:45 am. We later met a detachment of prisoners and were told by the escort that CERISY VALLEY was partically mopped up and most of the Units were moving forward to their objective. I than ordered all men of the 33rd and 35th Battalions togo forward to join their respective Units, and organised two posts with the men of the 34th Battalion, placing one in the enemy trench at P.24.b.3.3 (approx) and the other at P.18.d.0.7 (approx).

This latter post shortly afterwards established liaison with the 11th Brigade. The remainder of the Battalion assisted the 33rd and 35th Battalions in capturing and consolidating the GREEN Line. They were released from the GREEN Line between 9:45 am and 10:15 am and proceeded then to consolidate the GAILLY and RESERVE Lines as shown on map forwarded.

BOOTY. Owing to the conditions existing it was impossible to estimate the number of prisioners captured by the Battalion as prisoners from the 3 Battalions were grouped to reduce the number of men required for escort. So far no estimate has been made of the number of Trench Mortars and Machine guns etc, captured in the area. Salvage operations are in progress and as soon as they are completeda detailed report will be forwarded. In the CERISY VALLEY one 21 cm and eight 7.7 cm guns were captured together with large quantities of ammunition.

Major: Francis George GRANT.

Comanding Officer 34th Battalion AIF. (34th Battalion War Diary)

18th August 1918.

Weather threatening but clearing, following project bombardment on our right, heavy bombardment followed. C.O. called on left headquarters. Our planes brought down enemy plane in flames but it dropped behing BRAY. C.O. visited posts. 3 O/Rs Killed 1 Officer Lieutenant: 10480 Robert WIGHT and 6 O/Rs wounded.

(34th Battalion War Diary)

John was Wounded in Action; 3rd Occassion where he received a Gun Shot Wound to his Arm and was evacuated to the 53rd Casualty Clearing Station before he was transfered to the 2nd General Hospital at Harve on the 1st September and embarked for England the same day onboard the "Panama" and was admitted to the 1st Birmingham Military Hospital the next day. John was discharged from Hospital on the 16th of September to Littlemore Camp. Whislt he was on leave John married Elsie Hawkins a 20 year old Domestic Servant and they were married in the Parish Church of her home town of Harefield, Middlesex on the 22nd of October 1918. John was hospitalised with Influenza on the 31st of October and died on the 11th November 1918, just three weeks after their wedding.

ARMISTICE DAY. 11th November 1918

Seventeen members of the First AIF died on the 11th November 1918, the dat the Armistice ending world War 1 was signed. They came from all states in Australia: eight from New South Wales, three in Western Australia, two each in South Australia and Queensland. There was no pattern to their deaths. Some died of Wounds, others of illness. Most were single but some were married. Their ranks ranged from Private to Sergeant. Several had previously been wounded in action. One had been decorated for bravery. The highest and most decorated Australian who died on the 11th November was Military Medal recipient: Sergeant: 2135 John PAGE. M.M.

Newcastle Historical Society Inc. Journal No:168, December 2004.

BURIED WITH FULL MILITARY HONORS.

On the 15th November 1918 at 11:00am in St John the Evangelist Churchyard, Sutton Veny, in a Seperated Single Grave in Virgin Soil, No:22, Military Section, consecrated Ground. Sergeant: 2133 John PAGE M.M. was buried with Full Military Honors. The Coffin of polished elm with brass furnishing being drapped with the Australian Flag and conveyed to the graveside on a Gun Carriage, preceded by a Firing Party from the No:1 Australian Command Depot. Six Sergeant of deceased's late Company supported the Pall. Mrs Elsie Page (Wife) of 3 Park Lane, Harefield. Private: 3082 S.A.MADDEN (Cousin) 2nd Australian Machine Gun Company and Mrs Bishop (Friend) of 6 High Street, Harefield were present at the ceremony which was conducted by Chaplain the Rev A.S.M. MACPHERSON (Church of England). No:1 Command Depot Sutton Veny. Headquarters AIF Depots in United Kingdom were represented. Wreaths from wife and Mrs Bishop were placed on the grave.

Chaplain performing Burial Service

14th March 1919.

Informant; Sergeant: 3284 Alfred Edward DORRELL D Company, No:16th Platoon, 34th Battalion . I knew Lieutenant: 373 Albert DOWDING or Dowdy. We knew him as Lieutenant Dowdy. He had come from some other unit, he was in D Company. He was the only Lieutenant of a similar name in the battalion. He was short, thick set, clean shaven, dark and very quite. He was wounded in early June 1918 at VILLERS-BRETONNEUX, just in front of the village by a shell; the wound was in his leg; he was in charge of a Working Party, including Sergeant: 2135 John PAGE, since deceased, myself and others. He was picked up and put on a stretcher and taken back, and we congratulated him on getting a "Blighty". About five days later we were greatly suprised to hear he had died. We did not hear when he died. He was wounded during the night.

No:4 Australian General Hospital, RANDWICK, N.S.W.

14th March 1919.

Informant; Sergeant: 3284 Alfred Edward DORRELL D Company, No:16th Platoon, 34th Battalion. Lieutenant: 927 Vincent Charles CALLEN was my Platoon Officer in D Company, 16th Platoon. His name was "Vincent' and he was the only Officer of that name in the Battalion. He was killed instantly by Machine Gun fire about the 18th or 20th of August 1918 on the hill this side of "Happy Valley" on the left side of the River from Villers-Bretonneux, well up in front of Sailly le See. I was not in the trench at the time but heard of it the following night. He was killed at night time as he was inspecting the trench. Sergeant: 2135 John PAGE, since deceased saw it happen and told me about it . PAGE said Mr GALLEN was killed instantly. We advanced from this position and he was taken back for burial.

No:4 Australian General Hospital, RANDWICK, N.S.W.

John is remembered with honour and is commemerated in perpetuity by the Commonweath War Graves Commission at the Sutton Veny (St John) Churchyard, Sutton Veny, Wiltshire, England, United Kingdom.

sutton Veny Cemetery

Sutton Veny Cemetery

SUTTON VENY CEMETERY

Commonwealth War Graves Project

Johns Memorial Plaque:354300 to John Page was acquired in July 2016 from a dealer in N.S.W. and is now in the Harrower Collection. His Plaque was first issued to his Widow from London, England on the 28th November 1922.

Family Information

John was a single 28 year old Contractor from "Glengarry" Walgett, N.S.W. upon enlistment. Whilst in England John met Elsie Hawkins a 20 year old Domestic Servant and they were married in the Parish Church of her home town of Harefield, Middlesex on the 22nd of October 1918. John was hospitalised with Influenza on the 31st of October and died on the 11th November 1918, just three weeks after their wedding. Elsie lived at 20 winterbrook Road, Herne Hill, London, England.

Walget War Memorial

Walget War Memorial

WALGETT WAR MEMORIAL

Photo; David Harrower JP 2012.

His parents Peter and Esther Page were married in 1883 at Gunnedah, N.S.W. Marriage Cert:4957/1883 and had six children. Emily Jane Page born 1883 at Gunnedah, N.S.W. Birth Cert:19117/1883. William G Page born 1885 at Quirindi, N.S.W. Birth Cert:21376/1885.John Page born 1887 at Quirindi, N.S.W. Birth Cert:22788/1887 and died 11.11.1918 (Armistice Day) Sutton Veny, England. Thomas A Page born 1888 at Quirindi, N.S.W. Birth Cert:23466/1888. Charlotte R Page born 1890 at Quirindi, N.S.W. Birth Cert:29259/1890. Albert Ronald Page born 1894 at Quirindi, N.S.W. Birth Cert:28076/1894 and died 1961 at Darlington, N.S.W. Death Cert:7255/1961.

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Under Construction; 01/04/2008-18/09/2016.


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