James Martin JUDD (1895-1918)

9th Infantry Brigade AIF

MAIN MENU. 36th BATTALION PAGE. 35th BATTALION PAGE.


Military War and Victory Medals

36th BATTALION 35th BATTALION A.I.F.

Lieutenant: 1142 James Martin JUDD. M.M.


Born: 29th April 1895. Goulburn, New South Wales, Australia. Birth Cert:3449/1895.

Died: 22nd August 1918. Killed in Action Bray-sur-Somme, France.


Father: Tom James Judd. (18..-1941) Died at Petersham, N.S.W. Death Cert:845/1941.

Mother: Mary "May" Judd. nee: Bye. (1869-1952) Born at Goulburn, N.S.W. Birth Cert:10596/1869 and Died at Newtown, N.S.W. Death Cert:1461/1952.


INFORMATION

James Martin Judd served with the Gordon Club Cadets at Goulburn and the N.S.W. Irish Rifles before he enlisted with the AIF at Casula, N.S.W. and was allocated to duty as a German Consentration Camp Guard at Holsworthy, N.S.W for 14 months.

The largest internment camp in Australia during World War One was at Holsworthy, near Liverpool on the outskirts of Sydney. The camp held between 4,000 and 5,000 internees, most were either from the Austro-Hungarian empire, staff of German companies temporarily living in Australia, crews of vessels caught in Australian ports and naturalised and native born Australians of German descent. Prisoners were interned without trial, often without knowing their “crime”, and without the knowledge of their families.

James Martin Judd re enlisted with D Company 36th Battalion AIF at Broadmeadow Army Camp in January 1916

Maitland Camp at Rutherford 1916

MAITLAND CAMP RUTHERFORD N.S.W. 1916.

James embarked with D Company 36th Battalion from Sydney, N.S.W on board HMAT A72 "Beltana" on the 13th May 1916 and disembarked at Devonport, England on the 9th July 1916 and entrained during the afternoon for Amesbury, arriving at midnight and marching to hutments at Larkhill. Here the Battalion settled down to hard training, which included Route Marching, Trench Digging, Bomb Practice, Musketry and General Camp Routine.

Whilst here, James was admitted to the Fargo Military Hospital suffering from Influenza on the 5th October and after treatment he was marched back to rejoin the 36th Battalion on the 11th October at the Durrington Army Camp at Larkhill.

22nd November 1916.

Larkhill. Troops entrained at Amesbury Station in three trains. 1st Train 7:47am Compliment-Officers 11 and 327 others, 19 horses, 8 hand carts, 3 4 wheeled wagons and 9 bycicles. Lieutenant Colonel: James William Albert SIMPSON. Officer Commanding. A Company Lieutenant: Herman Augustine ARNOLD. B Company Lieutenant: 3 Harry WOODHAMS. C Company Lieutenant: James Michael JULEFF.

2nd Train 9:15am-Compliment-Officers 11 and 327 others. 20 horses, 2 two wheeled, 5 four wheeled vehicles. Major: Archibald Clifford BLACKLOW. Officer Commanding. A Company Lieutenant: Richard Henry DOYLE..

3rd Train 11:am- Compliment-Officers 10, 326 other ranks, 20 horses, 2 two wheeled, 5 four wheeled vehicles. Major: Archibald Leeson PRINCE. Officer Commanding. B Company Lieutenant: 1376 William James GORDON.

22nd November 1916

Embarked "Caesarea" 24 Officers, 811 others. Embarked "African Prince" 8 Officers 168 others, 59 horses, 15 four wheeled vehicles, 12 two wheeled vehicles and 9 bicycles. Total 32 Officers, others 979 left Southampton 6:00pm. 1 Officer 75 others detailed as sentries and boat guard. 1 Sergeant, 1 Corporal and 20 detailed as Firing Party. 5 Sanitary Police and 10 men as Sanitary Party.

23rd November 1916.

Arrived at La Havre 1:40am. Disembarked 7:25am. Marched via town to No:1 Rest Camp arrived 11:40 am. Remained at Rest Camp, Le Harve, till 6:30am 24th November 1916.

24th November 1916.

36th Battalion, less 8 Officers 250 Other Ranks marched via town to point 3 Railway Station, Le Harve at 8:00am. Entrainied and left Le Harve at 10:30am. Proceeded via Montcrolier Buchy, Abbeville 6:10am. 10 hours late via Boulogne Calais and Bailleul. Arrived at Bailleul at 4:25pm 25th November 1916.

25th November 1916.

Detrained at Bailleul marched to billets at Merris district. Arrived at billets 10:45pm. Quartered in 12 billets. Headquarters at Hameur Farm.

26th November 1916.

4 Officers 100 men "A" Company arrived at Merris at 8:30am. Remainder of Battalion arrived at Merris 4:00pm. Hostile aircraft shelled overhead 2:15pm.

27th November 1916.

8 N.C.O's detailed to attend Gas School for 4 days. All Officers instructed in Box Respirator by Divisional Gas Officer. General: Alexander John GODLEY and Gerenal: Sir John MONASH visited billets at Hameur Farm at 2:30pm. Captain: John Martin HAWKEY. and 1 N.C.O. per Company visited forward billets at Armentiers.

28th November 1916.

Battalion left for Armentieres in 16 Motor Lorries. Whole Battalion reported in billets at Armentieres at 5:30pm. Headquarters established at 6:00pm Rue De Strasburg.

29th November 1916.

Whole Battalion still in billets-supply Working Parties Only.

30th November 1916.

Visited the front line on left sector of defences at Armentiers.

7th June 1917.

THE BATTLE OF MESSINES

The 3rd Australian Divisions first major offensive was at Messines Ridge on the 7th June 1917. The Australian 3rd Division was a part of the II Anzac Corps which was allotted to the first assault. The 25th British, the New Zealand and 3rd Australian Divisions were the attacking force with the 4th Australian Division in reserve. The 4th Division were battle hardened troops who had fought many major battles. The 3rd Australian Division were having problems getting to the "jump off" point. The day before the 9th and 10th Infantry Brigades were bombarded by German Gas-Shells around Hill 63 and Ploegsteert Wood. Many of the Aussies were not wearing gas masks, but dispite this they pressed on even though they received 500 casualties.

They made it to the "jump off" point but only just with some of the men from the 9th and 10th going straight over the top without stopping. The mines went up and the attack commenced behind a protective barrage. The II Anzac Corps were attacking on the right with their objective being the southern shoulder of the ridge which included Messines, the Dover and St Yves areas as far south to the east of Ploegsteert Wood.

Major General Sir John MONASH's 3rd Division had to contend with a tricky 3 mile approach out of Ploegsteert Wood and after the German gas attack, but they were not detered. The 9th Infantry Brigade under Brigadier General: Alexander JOBSON and the 10th Infantry Brigade under Brigadier General W R NICHOLL had just made the jumping off point but some of the men did not stop, going straight into the assault from the approach march.

Their objective lay between St Yves and the Douve. The mines at Trench 127 and Trench 12 at Factory Farm were laid to aid this task. The explosions erupted a few seconds before zero hour and created craters of 200 feet in diameter, completely obliterating the German defence line as the 9th and 10th Infantry Brigades went over the top. The mine crates forced the 9th and 10th Brigades to veer to the left and right which caused some confusion with the main assault. It is testimony to the quality of training that every man knew the ground, tasks and objectives so well.

Private: 1804 John CARROLL 33rd Battalion, rushed the enemy's trench and bayoneted four of the German occupants. He then noticed a comrade in difficulties and went to his assistance, killing another German. He then attacked single handed a German Machine Gun Team, killing all three of them and capturing the gun. He later rescued two of his comrades who had been buried alive by German Shell Fire, and in spite of heavy shelling and machine gun fire he dug them out alive and saved them from certain death. John Carroll was awarded the Victoria Cross.

The German forward zone was completely engulfed and taken by the main assault. The two supporting battalions of each brigade then passed the leading battalion to continue the advance. The men were constantly re-supplied and the ridge was taken. There were many German prisoners taken during the offencive. The 3rd Division was well ahead with the 9th Infantry Brigade pushing on beyond Grey Farm, and on the right the 10th Infantry Brigade were veering left towards Septieme Barn north of Douve.

The German resistance was heavy but was generally brushed aside by tanks and artillery before the infantry had to become too involved.The 4th Bavarian Divisions Artillery had made little impact, but as the day wore on the 3rd Division and later the 4th Australian Division received many casulties from German artillery. (70% of all casualties during WW1 were from artillery).

By 9:00am nearly 6 hours after the assault began the Germans were in disaray, but there was a major problem as the Australians received less casualties as anticipated and when ordered to dig into the ridge they had so many men, that some could not find shelter. the 35th battalion were dug in around Seaforth Farm.

The second phase of the operation was to take the Oosttaverne Line. The 3rd Australian Division would now be in reserve with the 4th Division attacking. The 9th Infantry Brigade (33-34-35-36Bn) were near Thatched Cottage facing Warneton. The river Lys was to their right and the Ploegsteert Wood was now behind them.

Once their objectives were taken the troops consolidated. A barrarge to stop and counter attack was shortened and caught three battalions which had to retire. By 9:00pm this part of the Oosttaverne Line was abandoned. At 10:45pm General Godley ordered the 3rd and 4th Divisions to retake it. This they did by the early hours of the 8th of June.

The Battle for Messines Ridge during May-June 1917 saw 35 officers and 1,631 other ranks lose their lives.

9th Infantry Brigade Casulties.
33rd Battalion. AIF 8 Officers 382 Other ranks
34th Battalion. AIF 10 Officers 378 Other ranks
35th Battalion. AIF 5 Officers 431 Other ranks
36th Battalion. AIF 9 Officers 421 Other ranks
9th Machine Gun Company. AIF 2 Officer 17 Other ranks
9th Light Trench Mortor Battery. 1 Officer 2 Other ranks

Field Dressing Station, Messines 07/06/1917

FIELD DRESSING STATION, MESSINES 7th June 1917.

10th June 1917.

On the night of 10th June 1917, 200 men of the 36th Battalion formed up for an attack on a section of enemy line towards La Potterie Farm south of the little Douvebeek River between Ploegsteert Wood and Messines. There they were caught by a German bombardment.

Killed during this Action were; Captain: Francis John PIGGOTT.   Private: 2127 Frederick WRIGHT.

24 June 1917.

MILITARY MEDAL

Sergeant: 1142 James Martin JUDD. 36th Battalion AIF. 'The Brigade Commander has much pleasure in placing on record the name of this N.C.O. who was conspicuous for his bravery and gallantry in recent offensive action' 18 June 1917.

Commonwealth of Australia Gazette: 20 December 1917. Page 3377, position 103

London Gazette: 16 August 1917. Page 8427, position 104

James was marched in to Hospital after the action at Messines on the 8th July after he was treated bty the 9th Australian Field Ambulance suffering again from Influenza and Trench Fever James was transfered via Ambulance Train to the 2nd Australian General Hospital.

Hospital Train

Hospital Train

After James recovered he we joined his unit from Hospital on the 30th July and was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant on the 24th August 1917. James was detatched to the 2nd Army School of Instruction on the 30th September until the 3rd November when he rejoined the 36th Battalion in the Field. James was again promoted this time to the reank of Lieutenant on the 2nd December 1918 before he was granted leave to Paris on the 9th January 1918 until the 25th January.

4th-5th April 1918

The First VILLERS-BRETONNEUX

The Strength of the 9th Infantry Brigade was about 2,250 but their casulties during the 2 days of fighting numbered 30 Officers and 635 men either killed in action or missing.

9th Infantry Brigade Casulties.4th-5th April 1918
33rd Battalion. AIF 3 Officers 82 Other ranks
34th Battalion. AIF 5 Officers 120 Other ranks
35th Battalion. AIF 9 Officers 282 Other ranks (including 44 missing)
36th Battalion. AIF 12 Officers 133 Other ranks (including 1 missing)
9th Machine Gun Company. AIF 1 Officer 18 Other ranks (including 4 missing)

James was Wounded in Action on the 18th April when he was Gassed and was treated by the 55th Field Ambulance before being evacuated to the 47th Casualty Clearing Station for further treatment and was Invalided to England on the 30th April 1918 on board the Hospital Ship "Guildford Castle".

Hospital Ship Guildford Castle

Hospital Ship "Guildford Castle"

After arriving back in England he disembarked and was admitted to the 3rd London Hospital where he remained until his discharge after treatment on the 15th July and proceeded overseas for France via South Hampton on the 30th July 1918. James was marched in at Rouelles on the 1st August and was marched out to the front on the 5th August and rejoined the 35th Battalion AIF. James was attached to the 9th Infantry Brigade Headquarters, 35th Battalion. James went into actionon the 22nd at Bray.

22nd August 1918.

4.45 am. Operation commences, vide report on operation (B.M.33/259/2) of 23.8.1918) vide Apppendix 10. Enemy counter attack commences and continues with the result that the English troops on our left (47th Division) and 12th Division farther to the North retreated before the enemy who was making only a half-hearted attempt to gain ground on their front. The Enemy's attitude during this advance was one of hesitation. He was apparently supprised at the English withdrawl for no apparent reason and seemed to suspect it as being somewhat in the nature of a ruse to draw him on. This is the observation of the C.O. Right Battalion who viewed the course of the action from his command post at L.18.a.2.3. The result of these operations was to leave the left flank of the Brigade entirely "in the air" as the English troops became very demoralized during the process of the counter attack - App.10

2.30 p.m. Verbal Orders received from 3rd Australian Division for the Brigade to undertake an operation involving the capture of Bray-sur-Somme and the subsequent exploitation to the Western bank of the Somme running North and South through Squares L.18. and 24.

4.p.m. Above operation postponed until tomorrow morning for the following reasons - Our line is within 150 yards of the Western outskirts od Bray which are known to contain many machine guns. The ground on which our front line lies is a glacis slope running Eastwards towards the village. Any movement of even an individual in the vacinity of our front line and for some distance in rear of our front line immediately provokes enemy small arm fire. It would be impossible to rush BRAY without a barrage. It would be equally impossible to barrage the Western outskirts of BRAY without the same time bombarding the area in which our front line lies.

If the operation were performed during the hours of daylight out troops emerging from the Eastern outskirts of the village would come under the direct observation and fire of all arms from the high ground in L.11. L.17. and L.23. and would undoubtedly be held up in the low ground in L.16.a.&c. There would be no advantage in holding a line in L.16.a.& c. and our troops would in all probability be compelled to evacuate it after having suffered many unnecessary casualties.

This operation is now to be undertaken tomorrow morning early under cover of darkness and with the assistance of an artillery barrage which will satart on the Western outskirts of BRAY and creep through to the Eastern outskirts whilst the high ground in L.17. and L.23. is being bombarded by Heavy Artillery. The 11th Brigade will co-operate by conforming to our advance on our Northern Flank. This operation finally cancelled owing to enemy counter attack refered to in Appendix 10.

9th Infantry Brigade War Diary.

James was reported as Missing in Action on the 22nd August 1918 at Bray, France but was later changed to Killed in Action and is remembered with honour and is commemerated in perpetuity by the Commonweath War Graves Commission at the Cote 80 Frech National Cemetery, Etinehem, France.

Cote 80 Frech National Cemetery

Cote 80 Frech National Cemetery

COTE 80 FRENCH NATIONAL CEMETERY Etinehem, France.

Commonwealth War Graves Project

Family Information

James was a single 23 year old Carpenter from 240 Sydenham Road, Marrickville, N.S.W. upon enlistment. His parents Tom and May Judd were married in 1892 at Goulburn, N.S.W. Marriage Cert:3770/1882 and had 5 children. Eric L Judd born 1893 at Goulburn, N.S.W. Birth Cert:14637/1893. James Martin Judd born 1895 at Goulburn, N.S.W. Birth Cert:3449/1895 and died 1918 in Belgium during World War 1. Dulcie E Judd born 1898 at Goulburn, N.S.W. Birth Cert:30708/1898. Beatrice A Judd born 1906 at Newtown, N.S.W. Birth Cert:16367/1906. Ellen A Judd born 1907 at Newtown, N.S.W. Birth Cert:27082/1907 and died 1923 at Marrickville, N.S.W. Death Cert:17854/1923. Grace F Judd born 1909 at Marrickville, N.S.W. Birth Cert:38608/1909.

Cousin: Private: 477 Albert Selwyn JUDD 36th Bn Killed in Action 7 June 1917.

Military Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

World War 1 Records

© Commonwealth of Australia (National Archives of Australia)

Under Construction; 04/04/2016-19/06/2017.


Web Counter
Web Counter